Our Top 10 Tips for Saving Money in School

money-sign-iconCollege expenses can add up quickly, and it can be difficult to keep up with the costs with a busy schedule and a part-time job. Luckily, we have compiled 10 easy ways to save money throughout the school year:

1. Open a bank account. The first step to saving money is being able to monitor your expenses. Visit your local bank to learn about your options for opening a student bank account, if you haven’t done so already.
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Our Top 10 Tips for Academic Success

strategy-iconThe QSN theme for October is Academic Success — just in time for upcoming midterm exams for QuestBridge Scholars! Late nights and last-minute cram sessions may seem inevitable in college; but if you figure out the study techniques that work for you, then you can minimize these as much as possible.

We asked QuestBridge Staff and Quest Liaisons for their best study tips, and here are the top 10… Continue reading

Academic Success: Finding Academic Happiness

Have you ever wondered how to balance academic success with your overall well-being? This month, the QSN theme is Academic Success, and guest blogger Alejandra Mendoza (Columbia ’19) is kicking it off with her insight about academics, happiness, and the important balance between the two:

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Alejandra Mendoza, QuestBridge Scholar, Columbia ’19

As I was sitting in my Contemporary Civilization class today, my professor asked our class what happiness was. According to Aristotle, happiness is an activity, a progress. But we didn’t approach happiness the way he did. We listed nouns instead of verbs. We said health, money, love, instead of “living well.” Amidst our definition of happiness was academic success.

While academic success does have the capability to provide happiness, success does not happen overnight. Success, much like happiness, is a progress – it happens because we’re willing to work for it. Continue reading

My Quest to the White House: A Visit to the Office of Science and Technology Policy

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Ethiopia Getachew, QuestBridge Scholar, W&L ’19

Last week, 11 QuestBridge Scholars met face-to-face with staff from the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy to discuss issues that are important to them. Ethiopia Getachew, a Biochemistry major and a Computer Science minor on the pre-medical track at Washington and Lee University, reflected on the visit:


Two years ago from this day, I was in constant stress about applying to colleges and finding financial aid as an international student attending high school in the United States.

One year ago from this day, I had just arrived on the Washington and Lee University campus, excited for the four years ahead of me.

And on this day, I was on my way to the Office of Science and Technology Policy with incredibly smart and resilient young people who have dedicated themselves to pursuing their passion. Never would I have imagined this would be my life.
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Dear QB: How do I get along with my college roommate?

DearQBCollege move-in season is here, which means many students are living in tight quarters with a new roommate, or— in some cases — new roommates for the first time. Whether your roommate is a friend or someone you just met, this new living situation is ripe for opportunities to grow personally and inter-personally. Today, we’re highlighting some of the best ways for you to cultivate healthy relationships with your roommate. Continue reading

How to Support Yourself in College – What to Bring and What’s Already There

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Harpreet Singh, QuestBridge Scholar, Emory ’17

Harpreet Singh (Emory ’17) shared his path to becoming a QuestBridge Scholar recently, and now he’s sharing his advice! No matter where you are on your college journey, Harpreet’s insight can serve as a good reminder of how you can find the support you may need on campus.


Many students ask themselves as they are about to go to college – what should I bring to school? Many students may not be aware of the support resources that already exist on campus. It’s important to research and take advantage of these resources, but you also need to bring the things you need to support yourself. Here are three ways to cover all of the bases: Continue reading

Take the Stress Out of Asking for Help

Mental health. These are two words that are not mentioned often in the lives of low-income students. Oftentimes, money is the first word that is mentioned in low-income families. But stress and anxiety, among other emotions, can manifest themselves when money becomes the main stressor. Although money may be an inevitable stressor for low-income students, taking care of yourself should be a priority above all. If you aren’t taking care of yourself, you won’t be able to accomplish as much as you’d like.

So, as a college student, what should you do if you think stress if affecting you in a negative way? Continue reading

You’re Being Too Hard On Yourself

For some reason, our generation seems to glorify studying hard. All-nighters, caffeine, and cramming for that quiz right before class. Sound familiar? Well, if it does and you find yourself dozing off to the lecture about Maxwell-Boltzmann distributions, let me tell you something: you’re being too hard on yourself. Not only are you exhausting your brain and your own physical health, but you are also doing no help to your academic performance by overworking yourself.
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An Open Letter to My Mentor

Dear Mentor,

Maybe I say it too much, maybe I don’t say it at all, but let me put it out there right now: thank you.

For all that you’ve done, do, and may do in the future. You are so appreciated. You swept in to guide me, even when you didn’t need to, selflessly, patiently, and full heartedly. You knew coming into this type of relationship that they serve mainly as a one-way street, where you teach and give all that you can, and I attempt to absorb it all, and you stayed anyway.
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Do I Really Have To Do This Every Semester?

Let’s face it. Many of us won’t get the “dream” class schedule. You know… the one with early classes (nothing before 11 a.m.), that all end early (nothing past 3 p.m.), and here’s the kicker: no class on Fridays. I’ve only heard rumors of those types of schedules, but that does not mean you cannot make the most out of every semester at your university.

If you’re anything like me, picking courses each semester is much like deleting old e-mails: you have to do it eventually, but letting the task marinate seems like a better idea most days.
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